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are no exception. it's left people in this country wondering and worried what will happen next. the fabled scotland yard is reeling after two sudden resignations of its most senior leadership. sir paul stephenson, the police chief, and his deputy, john yates, career policemen who are the latest casualties in the phone hacking scandal. scotland yard is being accused of mishandling the investigation into "news of the world qug, maintaining at times close relationships with the very people they were supposed to be investigating. police officers accepting bribes from reporters has allegedly been commonplace. stephenson and yates deny any wrong doing on their part. >> i have acted with complete integrity and my conscience is clear. >> now the department tasked with counterterrorism and the 2012 olympics must find new leadership. what started as a scandal involving a single newspaper has now grown so large, it is rocking this country's institutions and the murdoch empire. so far, there has been four high profile resignations, ten arrests. most recently, rebecca brooks, one of rupert murdoch's most truste
a clothing store. >>> still to come tonight, a phone hacking scandal spills into scotland yard. >>> the aclu gets involved a dispute between dan schneider and a washington newspaper. >>> plus, a reunion between a mother ♪ [ rock ] [ chattering ] [ man on tv ] 96309. [ man ] ♪ she got it, you got it ♪ i got it, we got it [ groans ] ♪ who's got it see you later. ♪ yeah! ♪ come on, she got it you got it, we got it who's got it ♪ we're all different. that's why there are five new civics. the next-generation civic. only from honda. that's amazing. you know what else is amazing? how easy it is to save money on motorcycle, boate with geico. geico, saving people money, on more than just car insurance. >>> fallout of a phone hacking scandal continues to spread in the united kingdom tonight. scotland yard is looking for new leadership and even the prime minister's on the defense. david cameron cut short an overseas trip and will address parliament on wednesday. meanwhile, the man who first blew the whistle on the news of the world was found dead today. his death, however, not considered
broadcasting. a scandal that scotland yard now says may have targeted as many as 4,000 people. nbc's stephanie goss is in london for an update on moisture dough dock. >> the british public is looking for answers. the head of newscorp corporation rupert murdock, his son, james, and rebecca brooks have been asked to testify next week in front of a parliament. in an interview on the bbc, former prime minister gordon brown accused news international of employing known criminals to dig up personal information. >> i'm shocked. i'm genuinely shocked to find that this happened. because of the links with criminals. >> in 2006, a murdock paper run at the time by rebecca brooks reported that brown's newborn son had cystic fibrosis. now brown questions the methods the paper used to get that information. but a statement from news indianaer national says the story ran from a member of the public whose family has also experienced cystic fibrosis. also on the defensive, investigators from scotland yard who face accusations that police accepted bribees from reporters. >> an organization of 50,000 people, we ha
" reporters used scotland yard police officials to ping people they were following or were interested in. that means they used actual cell phone towers to locate some of the celebrities or politicians that they wanted to follow. these are incredibly incriminating allegations that just go to show how wide the scope of this is, and how high up it goes within scotland yard and you mentioned today that the scotland yard investigators were in a hearing in parliament today facing tough questions from the members of parliament over their accusations that they turned a blind eye to what "news of the world" was doing and police officers were accepting payments of bits of information and on top of that you have prime minister gordon brown in an emotional interview with the bbc expressing his anger in the tactics of the newspapers owned by rupert murdoch were engaged in criminal activities and hired known criminals to get very personal information from him. >> and also, you have got -- this story is more incredible by the moment, but the former pop star and still is, stephanie, george michael went
to it is the corruption allegations at scotland yard, the police agency. we're starting today's testimony with the police. >> reporter: that's right. two of the top cops in the country, former metropolitan police commissioner already resigned and then john yates in charge of the phone hacking investigation review he too resigned yesterday. this is how far the scandal has gone. it cast a shadow over scotland yard and everyone now especially lawmakers are trying to get to the bottom of just how much corruption was there, how cozy was the relationship between news of the world and scotland yard. >> it's going to have implications for david cameron's government. andy coleson is being alleged to have known about this when he was heading up the newspaper. >> reporter: this goes to show how it goes to the very hard of politics here basically andy was the chief spin doctor for prime minister david cameron so this is a major embarrassment for him and it's so bad that he's coming back to england early from his trip to south africa specifically to address these phone hacking allegations at a special day of parliame
years, especially for evan levin over in scotland, what influence was that to what he and norman thought as opposed to what ralph and arthur -- >> sure, it was huge. world war i was unbelievable. i mean, 1.8 million germans, 1.7 million russians, 1.4 million frenchmen. i mean, the death was just astonishing. even in the u.s. u.s. launched about 50,000, but really the fighting only lasted six months. they were losing like a 1020 meant a day. that's just unbelievable. you know, evan, he was over in scotland and then also in london a little bit. you know, he thought and
at a quarry in scotland. but, many as a matter of principle refused alternative service as well. and they were sent to prison. more than 6000 young englishman went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to that point in time ever in prison for political reasons in a western democracy. they served their sentences in places like wandsworth prison in the photograph here, in southwest london. those that you can see stretched across the opening there is to prevent people from committing suicide. prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under what was called the rule of silence, where you were not allowed to talk to your fellow prisoners. they found ways around it of course, tapping on cell walls and whispering to people and whatnot, but they lived several years under those conditions. the diet with terrible. there was a shortage of coal. the prisons were very cold. many people died in prison. so, i was fascinated by these war resisters. for the longest time, i could not figure out how, from a storytelling point of view, i was going to get the resisters and the gene
's office. >> we are also get, reports scotland yard is beefing up its team of investigators working the case as well. >> reporter: we have always known there is the possibility this investigation could go further. we have now been able to confirm that. the information commission says that they handed over details to the police of another private investigator that was illegally harvesting information and then selling it on to newspapers. newspapers that are not news international newspapers. among the top newspapers, according to the information commission, "the daily mail," "the daily mirror," those are not news international papers and it does seem now that they, too, may be included as part of the ongoing police investigation. one of the inning things is this is not necessarily phone hacking. this could be something called blagging which is impersonating somebody to try to get personal information about them. that is illegal here and also according to the information commission, corruption. this would be mean payouts basically to get that sort of information illegally. the details
, including scotland yard's number two, assistant commissioner john yates. >> we in the police service are truly accountable. those of us who take on the most difficult jobs clearly have to stand up and be counted when things go wrong. >> reporter: that was on the heels of his boss's resignation last night. commissioner paul stevenson, the head of scotland yard. and there have also now been at least ten arrests. the latest, rebekah brooks, the former chief executive of murdoch's british media holdings. she showed up in a prearranged appointment with police on sunday, and was subsequently held and questioned for nine hours before being released on bail. all of this is putting increasing pressure on the murdoch family. are you put murdoch, his son james and rebekah brooks are expected to appear before a government committee tomorrow to answer questions about the scandal. kurt gregory, nbc news. >> and there is another late development in this story. "the guardian" newspaper reports that london is examining a computer found in a bag throne into a trash can in an underground parking garage
families were victimized, too. scotland yard now says up to 4,000 people may have been targeted, in all. investigators are also looking into allegations that "news of the world" paid members of london's metropolitan police for information. the scandal prompted ford motor and a host of other companies to pull their ads from "news of the world." there are political implications too. in an emergency debate yesterday, members of parliament of both parties excoriated murdoch and his newspaper. but prime minister david cameron stopped short of calling for a separate official inquiry. >> what this government is doing is making sure that the fact the public and i feel so appalled about what has happened. murder victims, terrorist victims who have had their phones hacked is quite disgraceful and that is why it is important that there is a full police investigation with all the powers that they need. >> warner: labor leader ed miliband pointedly noted that a former "news of the world" editor had been part of cameron's inner circle. andy coulson was forced to resign as downing street communication
for questioning and found herself under arrest. hours later, britain's top police officer, the chief of scotland yard resigned, and he acknowledges that the investigation was inadequate, and steven yates now announcing his resignation. the scandal has been growing steadily after reports that there was a hacking of an answering machine by "news of the world." tomorrow murdoch and his son james are scheduled to appear on a hearing in parliament. cnn will bring you that testimony live. dan rivers is inla london. rebekah brooks is expected to testify tomorrow, and now what are the plans in terms of questioning her tomorrow? >> reporter: well, politicians will have to be careful how they frame the questions to her. in britain, if there is a pending trial or the possibility of a pending trial, you have to be very careful what kind of news coverage is gained from that, because they don't want to prejudge the trial here. they don't want to sway a potential juror one way or the other. and this testimony from rebekah brooks will be broadcast live not only here but around the world. they have to be fairly
in scotland but as a matter of principle refuse to alternative services as well and sent to prison. more than 6,000 young englishmen went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to the point* in time ever imprisoned for political reasons, they serve the sentences in places like here coming southwest london, that metal netting stretching across the opening is to prevent people from committing suicide. and prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under the rule of silence rerun not allowed to talk to our fellow prisoners. they found ways around a buy tapping and whispering but to live under those conditions was tough. the diet was terrible, shortage comment it was cold and many people died in prison. i was fascinated by the stories. for the longest time i could not figure out how from a story telling point* of view i would get the resistors and the generals into the same book. i did not want to do a series of portraits of one then the other but then a clue came to me one day when i wis reading a scholarly article about a well-known pacifist. she was the ardent o
, beatrice, was married in scotland. but unlike william ask kate's wedding, this was a tad more low-key. we have the story from london. >> the sun was shining, the crowd was loud and william and kate were greeted like rock stars as they arrived for today's royal wedding. it was hard for them not to steal the spotlight. because this royal couple don't live like royalty. the bride is the queen's grand daughter. but except for the guess list, there was little pomp and ceremony as she wed her long-time boyfriend. >> her grandmother happens to be the queen and head of state, but other than that there is really no other connection. >> and they are both world-class athletes. he was a key member of the rugby team that took the world cup for britain in 2003. she is expected to compete as a rider in the 2012 olympics. a career she probably could not have had if she'd taken a royal title with all the duties that go along with it. so while her cousin gets married in westminster, she's in a quaint scottish church. while 2 billion worldwide tuned into the other royal wedding. today's ceremony was for 400
are getting reports this morning scotland yards made an arrest in connection with the news corporation's phone hacking scandal. london's top cop is going to be in the hot seat today. let's bring in dan rivers. he has the latest live in london this morning. good morning, dan. >> reporter: good morning, yeah. another arrest this morning in this police inquiry. we understand that may be a former editor of "the news of the world." that's according to sky news here. he has been arrested this morning, taken into police custody. no comment from the news international themselves. the bigger picture here is there's still confusion about this request for the embamted chi chief. they are all being told to come and report to a committee here on tuesday. the deadline for them to respond is this morning. so far the committee had no response. this is pretty serious stuff. they can't force rupert and james murdoch to appear but they can force rebecca brooks to appear. if she continues to refuse to respond, issue a summons to her, they receiptcally they could send their security apparatus of the house behind m
scotland yard for accepting almost $20,000 in hospitality from a private health clinic after he had yound yund gone surgery. that health clinic was represented by a p.r. firm owned by former editor of "the news of the world." this picture is building up. this cozy relationship between the police and senior executives at news of the world. that made his position very difficult. he decided to step down last night. insisting all the while he had done nothing wrong. >> the issue of my integrity, let me set clear that i the -- the people that know me know my integrity is completely intact. i may wish we had done something differently but i will not lose sleep over my personal integrity. >> reporter: the problem was, though, this kind of web of connections just seems to be getting ever greater as more information comes to light between the police and people at the newspaper, rupert murdoch's newspaper, and number 10 downing street. the prime minister, david cameron, hired a former news of the world editor andy colton. that story still rumbling along in britain with more sort of suggestions that
. >>> a big arrest in the hacking world. police in scotland say one of the spokes folt notorious computer hacking groups is in custody. we're learning anonymous is urging people to close their paypal accounts. the group has targeted paypal since it stopped handling donations for wikileaks. >>> you complained, home improvement and construction tied with retail sales for the number three on the list. complaints were about lousy or unfinished work, false advertising, defective products and so on. number would, credit card billing fees, predty lending, aggressive debt collectors. number one, autos, false advertising, lemons and shoddy repairs. >>> before we go, today's businessman's special. the sports car is scoring number one for the seventh year in a row with drivers. i'll tell you which one is. more details after the break. 25 after the hour. [ diane lane ] is your anti-wrinkle cream gone... but not your wrinkles. new neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair. its retinol formula smoothes wrinkles in just one week. why wait if you don't have to. neutrogena®. why wait if you don't have to. we bel
-- first of all, these are national papers. in other words, distributed from the northern scotland to the very end of the southern tip of england. this is not a city paper. it's also a sunday paper. it's the thing that -- and it sells, i think the last count was 5.5 million copies, something like that. so it's not something small, and it's not, you know, like local rag. they've always been -- there's always been a stratum of fleet street papers as they used to be called, because they were all on fleet street, and no longer are on fleet street. you're looking at the reporter who in fact started, not on the news of the world, but one of its related. and the competition is huge. the pressure on these people to deliver is enormous. and the methods have always been traditionally not particularly nice. in fact, rather brutal. so the advance of technology has made it even easier, you know, they're not going to just let all these opportunities go by. so, you know, they're using hacking and they're using, you know, all that is available to them. in the case of the news of the world, there a
girl later found dead by police. dan is in scotland yard with more on this. there is tremendous outcry on the breach of privacy. tell us what was behind this story? >> reporter: there has been an on going scandal on the so-called phone hacking. the example of journalists hacking into the cell phone messages of celebrities and even royals to get salacious stories. we thought this dated or started back in 2005 when prince williams' phone was hacked into, and certificaain stories found way into the press. a number have been forced to resign. now it has been revealed that those same journalists may have hacked into the cell phone of a young 13-year-old school girl just after she disappeared in 2002. much earlier than any of the other scandals. the suggestion is they were listening in to the frantic messages of family and friends of where she was. they deleted messages to make more room on the cell phone mail box, giving hope to her family she was still alive, when in fact she was killed by a serial killer. police headquarters have been a meeting place where they will be asked questions. >>
don't think we have gotten to the bottom of this deal that great britain and scotland signed off on. i think the united states in a wink, signed off as well. it's a disgrace. >> it hasn't smelled right since then. he's still up and around. let's turn to sports now. i know you watched the end of the game. you were up late. >> i did. >> a wild night in atlanta. the ninth inning. a guy on third. great call from the dugout as the braves pitch out and catch mike mchenry at third. they sniff out the squeeze. extra innings. bases loaded in the 12th. in the 16th now. pittsburgh rips it down the line. look at the rookie. a nice leaping catch there. a couple pirates screaming for an end. way past their bedtime. a base hit wins it for atlanta. nice play. we are tied at three. 19th inning, folks getting a little strange. they are all the beer cups he could find at turner field. here is the play at the plate. julio tries to score. it appears he's out by five feet. he never touched the plate. >> oh, my god! >> the umpire calls him safe. safe. >> he wants to go home. >> he wanted to get back to the h
of the phone hacking surrounding "news of the world.." >> thousands targeted according to scotland yard and thousands of victims haven't been informed yet. much more on this coming up. we're going to be talking to john burns, "new york times" london bureau chief about what is next in this investigation. mine was earned over the south pacific in 1943. vietnam, 1967. i got mine in iraq, 2003. u.s.a.a. auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation, because it offers a superior level of protection and because u.s.a.a.'s commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto insurance quote. u.s.a.a. we know what it means to serve. with two children and no way to support them. people told me i wasn't going to do anything. and i just decided i have more to offer than that. i put myself through nursing school, and then i decided to go get a doctorate degree. university of phoenix gave me the knowledge to make a difference in people's lives. my name is dr. kimberly horton. i manage a network of over a thousand nurses,
you not properly review the evidence that was at scotland yard? why did you not look at that properly? >> there was nothing to indicate to me in july, 2009, but there was new material that would justify the investment of resources to go through that material. that material may have been placed in beanbags, but it was material that was gone through -- placed in bin bags, but that was material that was gone through. it was reviewed. >> you know when council is focused on a particular indictment, they are going to be focusing on evidence about that indictment. your responsibility was to look at matters outside of the individual indictment. you have thousands of pages of documents. why did you not look at them? >> two people had gone to court. i think it is excepted there was nothing in that "guardian" article that said that is new. we knew about that, so what would possibly persuade made in the absence of new evidence to make those choices? >> we are going to move on, up because you all have questions for the witness. can we keep them as brief as possible? >> i understand you did not rev
. so how far can we trust the yard? >> in this wine bar, just a stunt drove from scotland yard. they were on drinking terms. the latest revelations in this fast-moving story showed that the connection went deeper than s. -- than this. journalists always are looking for information. that is part of the job. in told by a former senior policemen, that and in this bar in the west and, these to be regular meetings between "news of the world" journalists and the head of the media to discuss fraud. i am told that the relationship was incredibly close. former commissioner met with "news of the world" 14 times in two years. >> was there any element of the relationship between the police and "news of the world" that is impeded them from pursuing the fund had been inquiry? that is the question. >> the man who decided not to reopen the hacking inquiry in 2009 has come under pressure to resign. earlier today, he was threatened with suspension, so he jumped. >> we in the police service are truly accountable. those of us to take on the most difficult jobs have to stand up and be counted when
due in court in two weeks on corruption charges. and the head of scotland yard paul stevenson is the latest person to resign over the hacking scandal at news international newspapers. he said he quit in response to wallace who doubled as a p.r. consultant to police. news corporation is owned by the parent company of fox news. brian? >> with the august 2nd deadline fast approaching, the president and lawmakers are still in a stalemate, as you know, over whether to raise the debt limit. but back in 2006 when president george w. bush was in office, every democrat including then senator barack obama voted against raising the debt limit. and every republican voted for it. so why have they swapped places? what's changed? joining us right now, former president obama white house communications advisor cory elams and republican national committee member didi benke. is it ok, cory, what's changed so much in such a short time? >> i'll tell you, brian, first thanks for having me on the show this morning. i'll tell you, the situation that's different between last time and this time, noth
of quick headlines for you. scotland yard has made another rest in the scandal linked to the now defunct news of the world. the paper was part of a news international, the u.k. newspaper division of newscorp which, of course, is owned by rupert murdoch and that's the parent company of fox news. well, newscorp apparently will have a response to that coming up. and take a look at this. an austrian man allowed to wear a pasta strainer in his driver's license photo. the man told officials that he's a pastafarian and it's an expression of his religious freedom. really, he's an atheist who was trying to make a point. funny. clayton? >> what i usually wear. thanks, gretchen. it's a county deep in debt. nassau county, new york is already hundreds of millions of dollars in the red. but now, the county wants taxpayers to take on $400 million in additional debt to build a new hockey stadium. for the islanders. this is really a good idea? tom swazy is a former nassau county executive and joins us to talk about it. nice to see you. >> how are you doing? >> how can they get away with this? >> there
movies like "the last king of scotland." his new project capture 24 hours of everyday life around the entire world. he asked you to upload video to youtube. took that footage, made it into a documentary called "life in a day." ready for your close-up? kevin joins us live in the studios next. she's had these shoes a long time. they're kind of my thing. and they were looking... nasty. vile. but i used tide and tide booster, and look at them now! now they can be my thing forever. yay. that's my tide. what's yours? i use tide sport because it helps get odors out of athletic clothes. i mean, i wear my yoga pants for everything. hiking, biking, pilates... [ woman ] brooke... okay. i wear yoga pants because i am too lazy for real pants. that's my tide. what's yours? >>> gloom good morning, new york city, partly cloudy, 76, feels like it's 76, thunderstorms about 80 degrees. >> last week, michele our producer was putting this pictures up of new york and thought she was lying. you couldn't see anything. soupy, gross, disgusting, that looks nice. >>> get ready for your close-up a film debut
the support of all of our colleagues. on december 21st, 1988, pan am 103 exploded over lockerbie scotland. 12 years later, the individual who was convicted of conspiracy for planting the bomb that brought down the flight was sent to serve a life sentence in august of 2009, he was released on compassionate grounds by the scottish government who said he has less than three months to live today approaching two years he remains live and in tripoli. these families have been searching for justice and for answers for more than 20 years. and the rupture of the gadhafi government presents a real opportunity to learn who ordered the bombing. who collected the intelligence to carry out the plan? who made the bomb and in addition to the bomber who bears responsibility for this and other heinous attacks and who should be brought to justice so does three things. it requires the president to continue many investigative activities into the bombing of pam am 103 and other terrorist attacks attributed to the government. the president urged the transitional national council and any successor government of libya
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)

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